Malaria

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Vision:

The Malaria Working Group supports the increased involvement of NGOs in integrated, community-based malaria programming; promotes collaboration between NGOs and national and international partners; and addresses bottlenecks, barriers, and gaps in related programming. The Working Group provides a forum where NGOs share lessons learned and disseminate state-of-the-art information related to malaria programming in order to improve the quality of their field-based programs.

Chair:

Eric Swedberg, Save the Children

Country-Level Collaborations

 In 1999, the desire to support malaria networks grew out of CORE Group’s Malaria Working Group, comprised of representatives from CORE Group member organizations and partners. Members were concerned that malaria was an under-addressed killer of children under the age of five.

In recognition of malaria’s impact on the health of mothers, children, and communities, CORE Group’s Malaria Working Group hosted a series of regional and country "Fresh Air" malaria workshops, which brought together a range of NGO, faithbased, Ministry of Health, academic, private sector, and multilateral representatives to discuss state-of-the-art practices, share programmatic experience, and plan how to work together to achieve the "Abuja Declaration" targets for malaria.

As an outgrowth of these meetings, by 2003, four high-priority countries (Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia) established national NGO "secretariats" to support ongoing networks to facilitate information sharing, problem solving, and leveraging of resources. The secretariats also sought to create a unified voice for NGO advocacy and participate in national, regional, and global level dialogues on malaria, health, and development. A coordinated approach involving many partners is needed to fully reach global targets for malaria reduction. CORE Group's experience and lessons learned in supporting and helping to grow contry-level NGO networks serve as a model for other countries and programs interested in organizing similar efforts.

Kenya: Kenya NGO's Alliance Against Malaria (KeNAAM) 

KeNAAM is a network of Kenyan civil society organisations (CSOs) working to eradicate malaria in Kenya. KeNAAM with support from CORE Group was formed in 2001, established a secretariat in 2003, and was legally registered in 2006.

Tools:

Webinars:

  • Improving Malaria Diagnostics (IMaD) Project Highlights (8/29/2012)
  • Mosquito Essentials: Basis for Malaria Prevention (2/24/2012)
  • The State of Antimalarial Drug Quality (9/20/2011)
  • Community-Based Malaria Treatment and Prevention: Project Palu-Alafia (3/15/2011)
  • ITPS - Malaria Control In Complex Emergencies (1/12/2010) Richard Allan, Director of the MENTOR Initiative, presents the revolutionary development of insecticide treated plastic sheeting (ITPS) for the dual purpose of providing shelter and vector control in emergency settings. This presents the first prospects for a practical and robust tool which could be held in regional emergency stocks and deployed amongst refugees and IDPs to rapidly ensure both emergency shelter and effective control of common insect disease vectors without the need for significant behaviour change by shelter occupants in order to achieve its protective effect. Learn the results of the latest studies and how evidence of the efficacy of ITPS as a vector control tool when used to construct temporary shelters, combined with its operational advantages and low risk usage, is now being recommended to be scaled up to meet the needs on the ground.
  • Zambia Integrated Management of Malaria and Pneumonia Study (12/15/2009) Dr. Kojo Yeboah-Antwi, who is an Assistant Professor of International Health at Boston University School of Public Health, presents the Zambia Integrated Management of Malaria and Pneumonia Study (ZIMMAPS), which was a cluster randomized controlled trial that aimed at demonstrating the effectiveness and feasibility of community-based management of pneumonia and malaria by community health workers (CHWs) in a rural district of Zambia. The CHWs, aided by the use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), managed malaria with ACTs and non-severe pneumonia with amoxicillin. The results were overwhelmingly positive and showed the capacity of CHWs to provide early and appropriate treatment to children under five years of age with fever and the reduction of ACT overuse. More Information: Treatment_Algorithm_InterventionTreatment_Algorithm_Control
  • Planning for Sustainability in Malaria Projects - Part 1 (8/13/2009)
  • Planning for Sustainability in Malaria Projects - Part 2 (8/18/2009) Dr. Eric Sarriot and Jennifer Yourkavitch of the Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program (MCHIP) describe a framework for assessing sustainability in malaria projects and discuss how projects can incorporate this model into their programming. They also presented an example from a sustainability workshop hosted by Christian Reformed World Relief Committee, a MCP grantee, in Malawi. Information about the framework can be previewed in the manual Take the Long View. More Information: Session HomeworkIndex Constructor

Reports:

Presentations:

  • Mozambique Net Hang-up Survey Results (Fall Meeting 9/14/2010) Christy Gavitt, Senior Health Team Coordinator for the American Red Cross (ARC) International Services Department summarized the final evaluation results of the Mozambique Red Cross's hang-up intervention with the Malaria Working Group. She explored the question of what the results really told us and discussed how the lessons learned from that survey will impact future hang-up operational research.

Case Studies & Field Stories

2012:

  • Increased knowledge of vector control strategies and began to explore the roles NGOs can play in their development, deployment, expansion and evaluation through a session at the 2011 CORE Group Fall Meeting entitled “Innovation and Efficiencies in Vector Control: the role of NGOs.”
  • Increased knowledge of achieving universal access to CCM of malaria where it is an appropriate strategy through collaborating with the CCH Working Group on a CCM technical update series and helping promote CCM Essentials Guide and Graphic and related resources.
  • Participated with the RBM Case Management Working Group through Shannon Downey and Zari Gill who are Co-Focal Persons for the CMWG Expanding Access to Effective Treatment Workstream and helped to liaise the WG by attending the meeting in Geneva June 11 – 13, 2012, communicating the results and learning from the meeting and soliciting input from members in order to represent member programming issues and opportunities in meetings.
  • Co-hosted and promoted web-based SOTA sessions and diffused resources related to MIP, CCM and MCP learning and helped promote and link to the MCP Strengthening National Malaria Control Efforts through Community-Based Strategies: The President’s Malaria Initiative’s Malaria Communities Program event 10/10/12.
  • Addressed malaria mismessaging in programs and at the community level through hosting and promoting a webinar on Mosquito Essentials: Basis for Malaria Prevention presented by Michael MacDonald. (2/24/2012)
  • Increased knowledge for malaria diagnostics and Universal Access of Malaria Diagnostic Testing and program learning through hosting a webinar on, Improving Malaria Diagnostics (IMaD) Project Highlights presented by Luis Benavente (8/29/2012).
  • With the Nutrition and SMRH Working Groups, continued to collaborate with MCHIP and other partners to increase knowledge and attention around integrated anemia prevention and control through the Anemia Task Force and helped organize a session on malaria in pregnancy in collaboration with MCHIP at the CORE Group 2012 Spring Meeting entitled Malaria in Pregnancy: Strengthening Health Systems to Improve Outcomes for MIP. Presentations available at: http://www.coregroup.org/resources/meetingreports/249-wednesdayspring-meeting-2012 .

2011:

  • With the vision of supporting the increased involvement of NGOs in integrated, community-based malaria programming; promoting collaboration between NGOs and national and international partners; and addressing bottlenecks, barriers, and gaps in related programming, the Malaria Working Group refined its objectives for the next five years to include the following:

1. Increasing NGO community-based malaria program knowledge by sharing and disseminating lessons learned and SOTA information to improve and advance related community MCH standards, strategies and practices.

2. Promoting partnerships and collaboration at national, regional and global levels in order to improve effective community-based malaria programming.

3. Representing community health NGO perspectives, values and experiences in national, regional, and global policy forums related to malaria.

  • The Malaria Working Group also strives to continue to provide a forum where NGOs and other partners share lessons learned and disseminate state-of-the-art information related to malaria programming in order to improve the quality of their field-based programs. The Working Group was led by Eric Swedberg with Save the Children and supported by Shannon Downey with CORE Group. Mark Maire with World Vision ended his time as Co-Chair, so an additional position opened up to interested Working Group members.
  • Through the CORE Group Fall and Spring Meetings, the Malaria Working Group organized and hosted technical updates to increase knowledge and improve programming including on innovation and efficiencies in vector control and the role of NGOs; community-based malaria treatment and prevention experiences in Benin; and the state of antimalarial drug quality in developing countries. The Malaria Working Group continued to link with the Community Child Health Working Group in the promotion of community case management including sessions on the roll-out of RDTs to CHWs in Rwanda; piloting CCM in Liberia through a PMI Malaria Communities Program; and CCM updates and improvements on benchmarks and supply chain management, and with the SMRH and Nutrition Working Groups on MIP including an "Addressing Anemia Full Spectrum" integrated session. The Working Group also strengthened its links and partnership with the USAID flagship project—Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program (MCHIP) especially with regards to CCM, MIP and anemia program learning.
  • Global Advocacy: At the global level, Malaria Working Group Members continued to represent community-focused public health perspectives, values and experiences in national, regional and global policy forums including participating with the RBM Partnership. Historically, CORE Group has participated with the RBM Partnership and has worked to facilitate the recognition and use of community-focused approaches for malaria prevention and control. This year, CORE Group attended the 5th Meeting of the RMB Partnership Case Management Working Group and subsequently took on the role of Co-Focal Person for the Expanding Access to Effective Treatment Workstream, creating an important opportunity to further link and leverage CORE Group’s collaborative community case management efforts to those at the global level. The Malaria Working Group also continued to diffuse other products, technical guidance and program learning, including the work of the "Net Mapping Project."

2010:

  • With the vision of supporting existing national collaborative partnerships and promoting new partnerships in which NGOs can actively be engaged in national level policy formation and innovative programming to scale up malaria prevention and control, the Malaria Working Group focused on four key areas: 1) technical capacity building, 2) integration, 3) advocacy and 4) community case management (CCM). In order to reach this vision, the Working Group had two main objectives: 1) supporting national and regional level activities to disseminate state of the art information and promoting collaborative planning and 2) promotion of dialogue across public/private and NGO entities to ensure best practice and quality programming. The Malaria Working Group was led by Eric Swedberg with Save the Children and Mark Maire with World Vision and supported by Shannon Downey with CORE Group.
  • Through the CORE Group Fall and Spring Meetings, the Malaria Working Group organized and hosted several technical updates to increase knowledge and improve community-based MCH programming including progress and process to reaching universal net coverage, meeting the challenges of large scale population displacement in emergencies and the use of insecticide treated plastic sheeting, improved diagnostic practices through the use of RDTs by CHWs, and innovative approaches to improved net use. In addition to malaria specific technical activities, the Malaria Working Group also linked to the efforts of other working groups to increase knowledge around mobilizing community-based volunteer health educators through the Care Group Model and partnering with the SMRH and Nutrition Working Groups to increase knowledge not only for malaria in pregnancy, but also integrated approaches to addressing anemia and maternal and child mortality and morbidity. This included a meeting of partners and the forming of an Anemia Task Force. The Malaria Working Group also partnered with the Community Child Health Working Group in the promotion of the Community Case Management Essentials Guide, advocating for CCM implementation and scale up in countries, and increased knowledge around the use of mHealth and CCM.
  • Global Advocacy: At the global level, Malaria Working Group Members continued to represent community-focused public health perspectives, values and experiences in national, regional and global policy forums including participating with the RBM Partnership . Participation included representation on Northern NGO Delegation for the Board and within other RBM mechanisms. Working Group Members attended the 17th and 18th RBM Board Meetings and provided ongoing facilitation of NGO input into policy and program decisions and reporting back for improved linkages between policy and programs. The Malaria Working Group also linked to the "Net Mapping Project" and helped to diffuse other products, technical guidance and program learning.

2009:

  • In 2009, the Malaria Working Group organized a series of technical updates through Elluminates and the CORE Group Fall and Spring Meetings to increase member and partner knowledge of community-based malaria programming advances, global directions and research. Topics included HIV/AIDS and malaria integration issues; quality assurance and supportive supervision in community case management; a collaborative approach to community-based prevention in Benin; and a review of insecticide-treated net use in sub-Saharan Africa. Furthermore, Malaria Working Group Members helped to revise the 2009 Malaria Technical Reference Materials and other key policy and advocacy documents.
  • Global Advocacy: At the global level, Malaria Working Group Members participated with the RBM Partnership through the Board and within other RBM mechanisms, including the Alliance for Malaria Prevention (AMP), Malaria Advocacy Working Group (MAWG) and the Monitoring and Evaluation Reference Group (MERG).  In 2009, Working Group Members attended the 15th and 16th RBM Board Meetings and provided valuable civil society input into global decision-making and coordination of malaria advocacy.
  • Country Collaboration: At the country level, the Malaria Working Group contributed to two CORE Group coordinated National Malaria Coordination Workshops in Kampala, Uganda in partnership with the Malaria and Childhood Illness Secretariat (MACIS) and in Luanda, Angola in partnership with Consaúde, Lda.  In partnership with PMI Malaria Communities Program, CORE Group facilitated these workshops to strengthen and coordinate the role of civil society with the respective National Malaria Control Programs. Each workshop drew over 170 participants that represented a wide range of civil society organizations, Ministry of Health, private sector, donor and academic malaria stakeholders.
  • In spring 2009, CORE Group’s work with the Voices for a Malaria-Free Future (Voices) project in Kenya and Mali ended. For three years, the Working Group has helped to support CORE Group’s country collaboration work with Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Communication Programs (JHU CCP) in these countries. CORE Group worked with two local NGO networks, KeNAAM in Kenya and Groupe Pivot Santé Population in Mali. In Kenya, key successes included an increase of malaria visibility in local and international media; increased access for CSOs to GFATM; increased access to ACTs; creation of powerful educational and advocacy tools and supported country malaria intervention coordination and facilitation, and in Mali, key successes included an increase in commitment and resources for malaria control; the dissemination of improved national malaria policies and a coordinated malaria strategic plan; an increase in visibility of malaria as an urgent issue; and an increase the number of celebrity and stakeholder advocates, known as ‘Champions’, who promoted the need for increased resource allocation for malaria.

2008:

  • Hosted several technical updates on topics including: Strategies to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy for malaria; promoting use of insecticide-treated nets for malaria prevention; Save the Children's work in Mali on community-based distribution of ACTs, and Christian Children's Fund work in Senegal on a community-based malaria and tuberculosis control program.
  • Kenya Country Collaboration for Malaria Advocacy: The CORE Group malaria Secretariat, KeNAAM, developed a documentary that advocates for the deregulation of ACTs to increase accessibility at the community level, for the need for an independent budget for malaria, and for a reliable health management information system. The documentary highlights testimonies from the community and implementers on the success and challenges of malaria intervention progress in Kenya. The DVD was designed to expose gaps that need to be addressed by policy makers and is being disseminated to partners and stakeholders as an advocacy tool. KeNAAM also conducted numerous additional advocacy efforts in order to engage policy makers and further break down policy barriers, including news articles, radio interviews, TV programs and letters to officials.
  • With the Nutrition and SMRH Working Groups, continued to collaborate with MCHIP and other partners to increase knowledge and attention around integrated anemia prevention and control through the Anemia Task Force and helped organize a session on malaria in pregnancy in collaboration with MCHIP at the CORE Group 2012 Spring Meeting entitled Malaria in Pregnancy: Strengthening Health Systems to Improve Outcomes for MIP. Presentations available at: http://www.coregroup.org/resources/meetingreports/249-wednesdayspring-meeting-2012.
 
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